Addressing Auto Problems: Should You Replace Your Thermostat?

August 8, 2008

Most of the time, replacing a thermostat need not be taken to the professionals. Depending on the design of the auto units under your hood, this job should be pretty easy to accomplish. Before doing anything under your auto’s hood, it’s highly important that you first, in a way, get “acquainted” with the different auto components located there. The more familiar you are with your auto systems’ layouts, the easier it is for you to replace and repair various auto parts.

Keep in mind that your auto thermostat won’t be easy to spot the first time around. It has its own housing and is generally located near the forefront of your engine, near your top radiator hose. To replace your thermostat, you need to first remove it from the housing. If there is a gasket, inspect it and replace it if it is no longer in great working order.

Some tools you may need for this job includes antifreeze or coolant, a rag for cleaning the thermostat housing and a screwdriver.

Follow these easy steps on replacing your thermostat.

Step #1: Make sure the engine is cool to touch. If your vehicle has just overheated, remember to wait an hour or two for the vehicle’s operating temperatures to go down.

Step #2: Work in a well-lighted area. Since you’ll be tampering with some of the most vital auto components in your vehicle, make sure you won’t accidentally sever anything that you’re not supposed to. A well-lighted area should prevent you from making any crucial errors when replacing your thermostat.

Step #3: Open your vehicle’s hood.

Step #4: Look for your vehicle’s thermostat housing. As I mentioned earlier, the thermostat housing should be near your top radiator hose, in front of your engine. If you can’t spot it, then it’s best to bring out your owner’s manual and look for it there. Unfortunately, there are some manuals that won’t indicate the exact location of the thermostat housing. If your other reference materials fail to show you where the thermostat is located, look between the engine block and the top radiator hose—it should be around the area.

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Addressing Auto Problems: Should You Replace Your Thermostat?

August 8, 2008

Auto thermostats are generally expected to last a driver around two to three years. There are, however, some exceptions to the rule. Some thermostats can last for up to five years. But if you encounter frequent overheating problems, or if you notice that cold air is blowing from your auto’s vents, then you need to check your thermostat and replace it, when needed.

As with the rest of your auto parts, picking out a thermostat depends on your vehicle’s specifications. You need to find a thermostat that’s crafted to work with your auto’s make and model. Thermostat rating levels usually vary, with some having rating levels of 160 and others 195 degrees Fahrenheit. If your owner’s manual doesn’t provide much info regarding your thermostat, then your best recourse is to purchase a thermostat that’s most similar to the current model you’re using.

Keep in mind that there are two primary types of thermostats available: dual-acting and standard. Dual-acting thermostats are especially designed to shut down your auto’s bypass circuit, and while this type of thermostat may sound appealing, you need to pick a replacement that matches the current type you’re using. If for example, you choose to replace your standard thermostat with a dual-acting one, expect this auto part to malfunction. So, the lesson here is to follow your auto’s requirements… to a tee, if possible.

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